What Kind Of Pickups Are In A Les Paul Epiphone?

By Christoper Horton •  Updated: 03/10/22 •  3 min read

Thinking about buying an Epiphone Les Paul? Wondering what kind of pickups they use? We have just the guide for you. Read on to find out ALL the different types of pickups that are used inside Epiphone Les Paul guitars…


What Kind Of Pickups Are In A Les Paul Epiphone? The Main 3…

There are really only three types of pickups that Epiphone uses in their production Les Paul guitars. The most popular are “Probuckers” which are designed by Gibson.

These pickups come in all of Epiphone’s base model/midrange instruments. The other two versions of Epiphone’s pickups come in its affordable models and its custom models.

Let’s take a look at the different pickups including the “Probucker” model.

Probucker Pickups:

These are the most popular model of pickups that Epiphone makes, and they come in all of the “Standard” Models of the Les Paul. The Probucker comes in Silver and Gold usually.

These are based on the Gibson Les Paul pickups called the “Burstbucker”. These are usually alnico magnet-based, medium output humbuckers. They have the popular sound of Gibson’s PAF pickups that are revered all around the world!

Gibson first designed these pickups in the 1950s and they have been popular ever since. Epiphone’s version is a very good replica of the original (unlike many of the Chibson guitars you can buy online).

Epiphone Branded (Generic):

These generally come in the more affordable instruments and are a ceramic magnet-based pickup made for high output. These only come in an “open coil” version, meaning they do not come with metal pickup covers.

While these are usually looked at as being “cheap” they actually work really well for a basic high output pickup. Some people like to switch them out for after-market pickups. But they work great!

These come standard in all of the Les Paul Special models. The special models are just stripped-down versions of the higher-end models, but they are great for beginners.

What Kind Of Pickups Are In A Les Paul Epiphone?

Gibson Custom Shop Pickups:

Since Gibson owns Epiphone, they often make a special run of the Les Paul with high-end Gibson parts. This, of course, includes the pickups! These are usually expensive models for Epiphone.

The pickups most often used for the higher-end Epiphone models are the “Burstbuckers” that come standard in many Gibson Les Paul instruments. These are a medium output PAF style pickup that is perfect for rock and metal.

These guitars usually come at a premium, but their quality is outstanding! These limited-edition models are released every year and usually feature different finishes and color schemes along with the Gibson Pickups and hardware.

Epiphone Les Paul With Fishman Fluence Pickups

One of Epiphone’s newer models, the Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy, uses Fishman Fluence pickups. It also happens to be one of our favorite guitars from the past couple of years. If you’re into metal and you don’t want to spend “Gibson Money” on a guitar, the Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy is very, very good.

The Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy is designed for modern metal; its Fishman Fluence pickups make it ideal for anyone that is looking for that tight, full-bodied modern metal sound. Think Lamb of God, Animals As Leaders, and whatnot.

The Best Gibson Les Paul Alternative
Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy
$845.00

With its Fishman Fluence humbuckers, iconic design, and amazing specs and components, the Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy is easily the best Gibson Les Paul on the market right now. In fact, I think I’d still take one of these over a proper Gibson Les Paul. It is that good…

Buy Now

Looking to pick up an Epiphone Les Paul this year? Make sure you read ELECTRIKJAM’s Guide To The 5 Best Epiphone Les Paul Models – there are some absolute beauties in there!

Christoper Horton

Christopher has been playing guitar and piano for 27 years. He has been active in the professional music industry for over two decades. He has toured for years with several bands and music projects. He worked in LA as a studio musician and engineer working with bands like IAMSOUND, Baroness, Kylesa, Black Tusk, Reflux, and Tripping Daisy. In between giving private lessons, he is recording a solo album for 2022-2023. Christopher plays Schecter guitars, BOSS amplifiers, and uses STL Tones in the studio.

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